‘The Dancing Queen’ Part of the Relationship with Diversity and Business Series: The Inclusion Clause of Our Company Policy: Setting a precedent for the LGBT community

Quite simply, this has been very difficult to write due firstly to the sensitive nature of this clause and because very little research has been done on it. I hope to open my own burlesque club based on further research into this clause.

Until then, let me enlighten you with an often well known fact that Oscar Wilde was sentenced to hard labour for 2 years- just for being gay! What sort of injustice is that?! Mind, this was in the 18th century but still, be thankful that gay rights have a come a long way since then! More recently, Alan Turing has been given a royal pardon after his sentence led to his eventual suicide in 1953- yet another injustice! While these are extreme cases, they’re indicative of the fear that the LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual, Tans-sexual) community has ensured through the centuries. Can you imagine having to get married to someone you never really loved- just to ‘prove’ you weren’t gay? Thankfully, LGBT rights have a come a long way since the illegalities of the 1950s. But what does this mean for us in the 21st century working environment today? Well, this is something I’m finding out and I’d like to challenge your ‘ism’. Or, in the words of James Baldwin,

‘Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced,’

nicely put James which is why when I say ‘challenge your “isms”’ I mean, for example, challenging ‘rac-ism’ or ‘sex-ism’ but strangely enough there’s no “ism” for being gay or queer (‘perhaps gay-ism?’). Isms are a two way street and responsibility for the root cause doesn’t always lie with the instigator. Instead, both parties are required to subscribe to the stereotype. What I mean is, one party could use the label but the other party has to accept that label too. In the words of Eleanor Roosevelt, ‘No one can make you feel inferior without your consent’.

So, the key is in recognising this and the half-truths we tell ourselves. This helps us be a more integrated workforce. That said, accepting our individual stereotypes gives us the individual power to change them which is what we like here at Zest and Fresh Mental Health Organisation. So how do we go about this, well this is one of the first steps into integration. Below I’ve attached a questionnaire which I’d like you to fill in and send me your comments below. (Adapted from Diversify, 2017)  So here it is: (link here)

Happy Beautiful day everyone,

Kate

CEO Zest and Fresh Mental Health Organisation

One thought on “‘The Dancing Queen’ Part of the Relationship with Diversity and Business Series: The Inclusion Clause of Our Company Policy: Setting a precedent for the LGBT community

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s